St Boswells Village Hall

Serving the community since 1896

St Boswells Village Hall, a neo-Tudor building in beautiful red sandstone, is strategically located at the hub of the village. Since 1896 it has been owned and managed by the local community, a much-loved venue which hosts a wide range of events, including weddings, dances, parties, musical performances, poetry readings, pilates & keep-fit classes, badminton matches, and Christmas fairs, together with meetings of the Parish Community Council, the Women’s Institute, children and toddler groups, and many local societies. It is regularly used as a polling station, and by the Blood Transfusion Service. Our hall is at the very centre of village life.

As a fine building of over 125 years old, it requires constant maintenance and upkeep. We have benefited from funding from several charitable organisations, such as the Central Borders Federation of Village Halls, the Climate Challenge Fund, and the National Lottery Awards for All Scotland. For an opportunity to help you can make a donation to the hall.

Available to book now

St Boswells Village Hall is the perfect multi-function hall with a great variety of potential uses including weddings, sports, meetings, concerts, rehearsals, coffee mornings, training, presentations and indoor markets.

There are three halls, which are available for hire either separately or together. The Main Hall incorporates a substantial stage; the Lesser Hall is linked to the kitchen by a serving hatch; the Upper Hall incorporates a small kitchen area.

Our vibrant village has an impressive range of independent shops and businesses (many of them award-winning, including a world-class bookshop), restaurants, a pub, and a wide range of societies and sporting clubs. There is an excellent community spirit, and an enthusiastic volunteer base. The village green, the largest in Scotland, is perfect for summer events. Just off the A68, St Boswells is ideally situated in the heart of the Scottish Borders. The village is 5 miles from the nearest small town, Melrose, and 10 miles from other larger towns – Galashiels, Selkirk, Kelso and Jedburgh.

The village may derive its name from St Boisil, a seventh-century monk of Melrose whose piety was so renowned it drew the young Saint Cuthbert (himself born in the Borders) to the abbey. Around 665 Cuthbert became prior of Lindisfarne. Walkers can retrace his steps from Scotland through Northumbria along the beautifully scenic St Cuthbert’s Way, a traditional pilgrimage route, some 62 miles long.

The view to the NE of St Boswells. Credit: Allan Drummond